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Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology - LEG/UFPR PDF

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FIFTY YEARS OF INVASION ECOLOGY Companion website A companion resources site for this book is available at: www.wiley.com/go/richardson/invasionecology F I F T Y Y E A R S O F I N VA S I O N E C O L O G Y The Legacy of Charles Elton Edited by David M. Richardson Centre for Invasion Biology Department of Botany & Zoology Stellenbosch University A John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication This edition fi rst published 2011 © 2011 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd Blackwell Publishing was acquired by John Wiley & Sons in February 2007. Blackwell’s publishing program has been merged with Wiley’s global Scientifi c, Technical and Medical business to form Wiley-Blackwell. Registered offi ce: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 8SQ, UK Editorial offi ces: 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford, OX4 2DQ, UK The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 8SQ, UK 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774, USA For details of our global editorial offi ces, for customer services and for information about how to apply for permission to reuse the copyright material in this book please see our website at www.wiley.com/wiley-blackwell. The right of the author to be identifi ed as the author of this work has been asserted in accordance with the UK Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, except as permitted by the UK Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, without the prior permission of the publisher. Designations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimed as trademarks. All brand names and product names used in this book are trade names, service marks, trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The publisher is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book. This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold on the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering professional services. If professional advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Fifty years of invasion ecology : the legacy of Charles Elton / edited by David M. Richardson. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-4443-3585-9 (hardcover : alk. paper) – ISBN 978-1-4443-3586-6 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Biological invasions. 2. Biological invasions–Study and teaching–History.. 3. Elton, Charles S. (Charles Sutherland), 1900–1991. I. Richardson, D. M. (David M.), 1958- II. Title: 50 years of invasion ecology. QH353.F54 2011 577’.18–dc22 2010030974 A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. This book is published in the following electronic formats: ePDF 978-1-4443-2999-5; Wiley Online Library 978-1-4443-2998-8; ePub 978-1-4443-3000-7 Set in 9/11pt PhotinaMT by Toppan Best-set Premedia Limited 1 2011 Contents Contributors, vii 6 Invasion ecology and restoration ecology: parallel evolution in two fi elds of endeavour, 61 Foreword, xi RICHARD J. HOBBS AND DAVID M. RICHARDSON Introduction, xiii PART 3 NEW TAKES ON INVASION PATTERNS, 71 PART 1 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES, 1 7 Biological invasions in Europe 50 years after Elton: time to sound the ALARM, 73 1 A world of thought: ‘The Ecology of Invasions PETR PYŠEK AND PHILIP E. HULME by Animals and Plants’ and Charles Elton’s life’s work, 3 8 Fifty years of tree pest and pathogen invasions, ROGER L. KITCHING increasingly threatening world forests, 89 MICHAEL J. WINGFIELD, BERNARD SLIPPERS, 2 Charles Elton: neither founder nor siren, JOLANDA ROUX AND BRENDA D. WINGFIELD but prophet, 11 DANIEL SIMBERLOFF PART 4 THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF 3 The inviolate sea? Charles Elton and INVASION ECOLOGY,101 biological invasions in the world’s oceans, 25 JAMES T. CARLTON 9 A movement ecology approach to study seed dispersal and plant invasion: an overview and application of seed dispersal by fruit bats, 103 4 The rise and fall of biotic nativeness: ASAF TSOAR, DAVID SHOHAMI a historical perspective, 35 AND RAN NATHAN MATTHEW K. CHEW AND ANDREW L. HAMILTON 10 Biodiversity as a bulwark against invasion: conceptual threads since Elton, 121 JASON D. FRIDLEY PART 2 EVOLUTION AND CURRENT DIMENSIONS OF 11 Soil biota and plant invasions: biogeographical INVASION ECOLOGY, 49 effects on plant–microbe interactions, 131 RAGAN M. CALLAWAY AND MARNIE E. ROUT 5 Patterns and rate of growth of studies in invasion ecology, 51 12 Mutualisms: key drivers of invasions ... key HUGH J. MACISAAC, RAHEL A. TEDLA casualties of invasions, 143 AND ANTHONY RICCIARDI ANNA TRAVESET AND DAVID M. RICHARDSON v vi Contents 13 Fifty years on: confronting Elton’s 22 DNA barcoding of invasive species, 289 hypotheses about invasion success HUGH B. CROSS, ANDREW J. LOWE, with data from exotic birds, 161 C. FREDERICO D. GURGEL TIM M. BLACKBURN, JULIE L. LOCKWOOD AND PHILLIP CASSEY 23 Biosecurity: the changing face of invasion biology, 301 14 Is rapid adaptive evolution important PHILIP E. HULME in successful invasions?, 175 ELEANOR E. DORMONTT, ANDREW J. LOWE 24 Elton and the economics of AND PETER J. PRENTIS biological invasions, 315 CHARLES PERRINGS 15 Why reproductive systems matter for the invasion biology of plants, 195 25 Modelling spread in invasion ecology: SPENCER C.H. BARRETT a synthesis, 329 16 Impacts of biological invasions on CANG HUI, RAINER M. KRUG freshwater ecosystems, 211 AND DAVID M. RICHARDSON ANTHONY RICCIARDI AND HUGH J. MACISAAC 26 Responses of invasive species to a changing 17 Expanding the propagule pressure concept climate and atmosphere, 345 to understand the impact of biological JEFFREY S. DUKES invasions, 225 ANTHONY RICCIARDI, LISA A. JONES, ÅSA M. 27 Conceptual clarity, scientifi c rigour and ‘The KESTRUP AND JESSICA M. WARD Stories We Are’: engaging with two challenges to the objectivity of invasion biology, 359 PART 5 POSTER-CHILD INVADERS, JOHAN HATTINGH THEN AND NOW, 237 28 Changing perspectives on managing biological 18 Elton’s insights into the ecology of ant invasions: insights from South Africa and the invasions: lessons learned and lessons Working for Water programme, 377 still to be learned, 239 BRIAN W. VAN WILGEN, AHMED KHAN NATHAN J. SANDERS AND ANDREW V. SUAREZ AND CHRISTO MARAIS 19 Fifty years of ‘Waging war on cheatgrass’: research advances, while meaningful PART 7 CONCLUSIONS, 395 control languishes, 253 RICHARD N. MACK 29 Invasion science: the roads travelled and the roads ahead, 397 PART 6 NEW DIRECTIONS DAVID M. RICHARDSON AND TECHNOLOGIES, NEW CHALLENGES, 267 30 A compendium of essential concepts and terminology in invasion ecology, 409 20 Researching invasive species 50 years after Elton: DAVID M. RICHARDSON, PETR PYSˇEK a cautionary tale, 269 AND JAMES T. CARLTON MARK A. DAVIS 21 Invasions and ecosystems: vulnerabilities and Taxonomic Index, 421 the contribution of new technologies, 277 PETER M. VITOUSEK, CARLA M. D’ANTONIO General Index, 425 AND GREGORY P. ASNER A companion resources site for this book is available at: www.wiley.com/go/richardson/invasionecology Contributors GREGORY P. ASNER, D epartment of Global Ecology, CARLA M. D’ ANTONIO, Department of Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, Evolution and Marine Biology and Program in USA. [ [email protected] ] Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA. [ [email protected] ] SPENCER C.H. BARRETT,D epartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, MARK A. DAVIS, D epartment of Biology, Macalester Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada. [s [email protected] College, Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA. [ [email protected] ca ] laster.edu ] TIM M. BLACKBURN, I nstitute of Zoology, Zoological ELEANOR E. DORMONTT, A ustralian Centre for Society of London, Regent ’ s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK. Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity, School of Earth [ [email protected] ] and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. [ [email protected] ] RAGAN M. CALLAWAY,D ivision of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. [ ray. JEFFREY S. DUKES, D epartment of Forestry and [email protected] ] Natural Resources and Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 - 2061, JAMES T. CARLTON, M aritime Studies Program, USA. [ [email protected] ] Williams College - Mystic Seaport, Mystic, CT 06355, USA. [ [email protected] ] JASON D. FRIDLEY, D epartment of Biology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA. [ [email protected] PHILLIP CASSEY, S chool of Biosciences, Birmingham edu ] University, Edgbaston, UK; and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, C. FREDERICO D. GURGEL, S chool of Earth and Australia. [ [email protected] ] Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia; and State Herbarium of MATTHEW K. CHEW, A rizona State University School South Australia, Department of Environment and of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 - 4501, USA. [ [email protected] Natural Resources; and South Australian Research and asu.edu ] Development Institute, Aquatic Sciences. [ [email protected] adelaide.edu.au ] HUGH B. CROSS, S tate Herbarium of South Australia, Science Resource Centre, Department of Environment and ANDREW L. HAMILTON, A rizona State University Natural Resources, and Australian Centre for Evolutionary School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287 - 4501 USA. Biology and Biodiversity, School of Earth and Environmental [ [email protected] ] Sciences, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia. [ [email protected] ] vii viii Contributors JOHAN HATTINGH, D epartment of Philosophy, HUGH J. MACISAAC, G reat Lakes Institute for Stellenbosch University, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. [ [email protected] ] RICHARD J. HOBBS, S chool of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, RICHARD N. MACK, S chool of Biological Sciences, Australia. [ [email protected] ] Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. [ [email protected] ] CANG HUI, C entre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, 7602 CHRISTO MARAIS, W orking for Water Programme, Matieland, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] Cape Town, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] PHILIP E. HULME, T he Bio - Protection Research Centre, HAROLD A. MOONEY,D epartment of Biology, Stanford Lincoln University, PO Box 84, Christchurch, New University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. [ [email protected] Zealand. [p [email protected] ] stanford.edu] LISA A. JONES, R edpath Museum and Department of RAN NATHAN, M ovement Ecology Laboratory, Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, Canada. [ [email protected] ] Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Israel. [ [email protected] ] AHMED KHAN, W orking for Water Programme, Cape Town, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] CHARLES PERRINGS, S chool of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. [ Charles. ÅS A M. KESTRUP, R edpath Museum and Department [email protected] ] of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Canada. [ [email protected] ] PETER J. PRENTIS, S chool of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, ROGER L. KITCHING, G riffi th School of the Australia. [ [email protected] ] Environment, Griffi th University, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia. [ [email protected]fi th.edu.au ] PETR PYŠ EK, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ - 252 43 Pr u˚ honice, Czech RAINER M. KRUG, C entre for Invasion Biology, Republic; and Department of Ecology, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Charles University, Vini cˇ n á 7, CZ - 128 01 Praha 2, Czech 7602 Matieland, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] Republic. [e - mail: [email protected] ] JULIE L. LOCKWOOD, D epartment of Ecology, ANTHONY RICCIARDI, R edpath Museum, McGill Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Canada. [ tony. New Brunswick, NJ 08901- 8 551, USA. [ [email protected] [email protected]] aesop.rutgers.edu ] DAVID M. RICHARDSON, C entre for Invasion Biology, ANDREW J. LOWE,S tate Herbarium of South Australia, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Science Resource Centre, Department of Environment and 7602 Matieland, South Africa. [ [email protected] ] Natural Resources, and Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity, School of Earth and Environmental MARNIE E. ROUT, D ivision of Biological Sciences, Sciences, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, SA 5005, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Australia. [ [email protected] ] [ [email protected] ]

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