ebook img

Chinese Nutrition Therapy PDF

275 Pages·2007·5.45 MB·English
Save to my drive
Quick download
Download

Preview Chinese Nutrition Therapy

Contents About this Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XI 1 Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A Introduction to the Basic Principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chinese Dietetics . . . 3 Yin and Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Therapeutic Principles of TCM. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yin And Yang are Opposites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yin And Yang are Divisible but Inseparable (Yin Yang Ke Fen Er Bu Ke Li). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yin And Yang are Rooted in Each Other (Yin Yang Hu Gen) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yin And Yang Counterbalance Each Other (Yin Yang Zhi Yue) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yin And Yang Mutually Transform Each Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Five Phases (Wu Xing). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The Five Basic Substances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Life Force—Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Congenital Essence—Jing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Blood—Xue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Spirit—Shen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Body Fluids—Jin Ye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Causes of Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 External Bioclimatic Factors or Impediments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Wind. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Cold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Dampness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Dryness (Zao) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Internal Factors, “The Five Minds (Emotions)” (Wu Shi). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Traditional Chinese Nutrition Theory. . . . . . 17 The Qi Energy Concept of TCM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Congenital Constitution Essence (Jing) . . . . 17 Gu Qi (Drum Qi, or Food Qi) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Ancestral (Air) Qi (Zong Qi). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Function of the Triple Burner (San Jiao) . . . . 20 B Methodology of Nutritional Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Energetics of Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Energetic Thermal Nature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Hot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Warm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Neutral. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Cold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 “Yang Foods” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Qi Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Yang Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 “Yin Foods” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Yin Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Yang Repletion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 The Five Flavors (Wu Wei) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Sweet Flavor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Acrid Flavor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Salty Flavor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Sour Flavor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bitter Flavor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 V Flavor Association with Organ Networks . . 29 Example: Carrot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Qi Movement Caused by Food: Food Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Upbearing Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Floating Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Downbearing Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Falling Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Influencing the Thermal Nature of Foods. . 31 Cooling Cooking Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Warming Cooking Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Cooking Methods in Detail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Baking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Blanching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Frying and Roasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Steaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Grilling/Broiling/Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Boiling/Simmering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Cooking with Alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Boiling with Plentiful Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Cooking with Cooling Ingredients (e.g., Fruit, Sprouts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Slow, Gentle Frying (Braising) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Salting (Pickling in Brine) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Smoking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Seasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Meal Preparation in Tune with the Five Phases (Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, Water) . 35 2 Chinese Dietetics in Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Basic Recommendations of Chinese Dietetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 The Path to Healthy Eating Habits . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Inner Attitude and Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Eating with Enjoyment and in a Relaxed Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 General Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Cooking Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Food Quantity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Food Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Flavor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Energetic Thermal Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Special Significance of the Earth Phase . . . . 42 “Strengthening the Inner Center”. . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Nutrition and Daily Rhythms . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Lunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Evening Meal/Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Nutrition and Seasonal Rhythms . . . . . . . . . 45 Spring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Summer (Hot Season) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Autumn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Winter (Cold Season). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Nutrition and Pathogenic Factors . . . . . . . . . 47 Cold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Dampness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Dryness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 External Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Wind–Cold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Wind–Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Internal Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Nutrition and the Human Life Cycle . . . . . . . 49 Children and Young People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Midlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Older People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 VI Contents 3 Practical Application of Chinese Dietetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 A General Applications of Chinese Dietetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Practical Guidelines for Giving Nutritional Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 The Role of Chinese Nutrition in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 General Indications for Chinese Dietetics . . . . 53 Don’t Worry about Dogmatism . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Tips for Giving Nutritional Advice . . . . . . . . 54 General Nutritional Recommendations (for sharing with patients). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Application Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 � General Qi Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 � General Yang Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 � General Yin Vacuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 � Yin Repletion (Excess) and Dampness . . . . . 59 � Yang Repletion (Excess) Conditions . . . . . . . 59 � Blood Vacuity (Xue Xu) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 � Strengthening Defense Qi (Wei Qi) . . . . . . . . 62 � Supplementing Lung Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 � Dampness and Phlegm Conditions . . . . . . . . 64 B Application of Chinese Dietetics for Specific Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Network: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Bowel (Zang Organ): Spleen/Pancreas (Pi), SP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Viscera (Fu Organ): Stomach (Wei) ST. . . . . . . . 67 Tasks and Functions of Spleen/Pancreas and Stomach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Governance of Body Fluids and Liquids . . . 68 Production and Retention of Blood . . . . . . . 68 Governance of Connective Tissue . . . . . . . . . 69 Special Diet for Spleen/ Pancreas–Stomach Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Spleen Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition . . . . 69 � Spleen Qi Vacuity (Pi Qi Xu). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 � Spleen Yang Vacuity (Pi Yang Xu). . . . . . . . . . 69 Organ Network Spleen/ Pancreas–Stomach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 General Causes of Stomach Dysfunction. . . 72 Stomach Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition . . 73 � Stomach Qi Vacuity (Wei Qi Xu) . . . . . . . . . . . 73 � Stomach Yin Vacuity (Wei Yin Xu) . . . . . . . . . 74 � Stomach Qi Vacuity with Cold (Wei Qi Xu Han). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 � Food Stagnating in the Stomach (Shi Zhi Wei Wan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 � Stomach Fire (Wei Re) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Organ Network: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Bowel (Zang Organ): Lung (Fei), LU . . . . . . . . . . 78 Viscera (Fu Organ): Large Intestine (Da Chang) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Organ Network Lung–Large Intestine . . . . . . . . 78 Nutrition and Organ Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Lung Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition. . . . . . 79 � Lung Qi Vacuity (Fei Qi Xu). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 � Phlegm–Damp Obstructing the Lung (Tan Shi Zu Fei) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 � Lung Yin Vacuity (Fei Yin Xu). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Organ Network: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Bowel (Zang Organ): Kidney (Shen), KI . . . . . . . 83 Viscera (Fu Organ): Bladder (Pang Guang). . . . 83 Organ Network Kidney–Bladder. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Kidney Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition. . . . 84 � Kidney Qi Vacuity (Shen Qi Xu). . . . . . . . . . . . 85 � Kidney Yang Vacuity (Shen Yang Xu). . . . . . . 85 � Kidney Yin Vacuity (Shen Yin Xu) . . . . . . . . . . 86 Kidney Yin Vacuity (Shen Yin Xu), Heart Yin Vacuity (Xin Yin Xu), Noninteraction of the Heart and Kidney (Xin Shen Bu Jiao) . . . . . . . . . 88 Organ Network: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Bowel (Zang Organ): Liver (Gan), LR . . . . . . . . . 90 Viscera (Fu Organ): Gallbladder (Dan), GB. . . . 90 Organ Network Liver–Gallbladder . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Nutrition and Organ Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Liver Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition. . . . . . 91 � Binding Depression of Liver Qi (Gan Qi Yu Jie). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 � Ascendant Liver Yang (Gan Yang Shang Kang) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 � Liver Fire Flaming Upward (Gan Huo Shang Yan). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 � Liver Yin Vacuity (Gan Yin Xu). . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Contents VII � Liver Blood Vacuity (Gan Xue Xu) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Organ Network: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Bowel (Zang Organ): Heart (Xin), HT. . . . . . . . . 97 Viscera (Fu Organ): Small Intestine (Xiao Chang). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Organ Network Heart–Small Intestine . . . . . . . 97 Nutrition and Organ Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Heart Syndromes and Chinese Nutrition . . . . . 98 � Heart Yang Vacuity (Xin Yang Xu) . . . . . . . . . 98 � Heart Blood Vacuity (Xin Xue Xu). . . . . . . . . . 99 � Heart Yin Vacuity (Xin Yin Xu) . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 � Heart Fire Flaming Upward (Xin Huo Shang Yan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 4 Food Classification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Bamboo Sprouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Cabbage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Chinese Cabbage (Napa Cabbage) . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Cucumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Eggplant (Aubergine). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Green Onions (Spring Onions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Leek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Lettuce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Lotus Root. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Onion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Spinach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Sweet Potato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Tomato. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Grains and Soy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Barley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Buckwheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Millet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Oats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Rice (White and Brown) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Rye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Spelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Soybean, Black. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Soybean, Yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Wheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Spices, Herbs, Sweeteners, Condiments. . . 120 Chili . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Cinnamon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Coriander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Ginger, Fresh or Dried . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Garlic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Mushrooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Pepper (Seasoning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Seaweed (General) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Soy Sauce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Sweeteners: Brown or Whole Cane Sugar . . . . 126 Sweeteners: Honey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Sweeteners: Malt Sugar–Maltose–Malt Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Sweeteners: White Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Vinegar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Fruit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Apple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Apricot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Banana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Grapefruit, Pomelo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Grapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Kiwi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Lemon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Orange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Peach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Pear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Pineapple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Plum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Watermelon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 VIII Contents Meat and Poultry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Beef. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Beef Liver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Chicken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Chicken Liver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Duck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Lamb, Mutton, Sheep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Pork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Rabbit/Hare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Venison (Deer). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Fish/Sea Food. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Anchovies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Carp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Crab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Eel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Herring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Mackerel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Mussels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Oysters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Prawns/Crayfish/Lobster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Sardines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Squid, Octopus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Trout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Tuna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Dairy Products, Eggs, Oils and Fats . . . . . . . 149 Butter and Cream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Cow Milk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Cow Milk Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Chicken Eggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Goat and Sheep Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Goat and Sheep Milk Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Peanut Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Sesame Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Soybean Oil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Yogurt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Nuts and Seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Almonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Black Sesame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Chestnut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Hazelnut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Peanut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Pine Nuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Sunflower Seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Alcoholic Beverages, Coffee and Tea . . . . . . 159 Alcoholic Beverages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Coffee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Tea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5 Clinical Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Respiratory Tract Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Main Symptom: Colds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Bronchitis/Chronic Bronchitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Main Symptom: Cough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Main Symptom: Sore Throat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Main Symptom: Frontal Sinusitis and Maxillary Sinusitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Bronchial Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Gastrointestinal Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Main Symptom: Diarrhea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Main Symptom: Constipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Main Symptom: Epigastric Disorders . . . . . . . . 190 Main Symptom: Nausea and Emesis (Vomiting) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Main Symptom: Meteorism (Abdominal Distension) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Main Symptom: Hiccough, Singult (Sighing, Sobbing). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Cardiovascular Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 General Weakness, Lack of Energy, Low Blood Pressure. . . . . . . . . . 203 Main Symptom: Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Contents IX Eye Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Inflammation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Skin Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Neurodermatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Acne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Urogenital Disorders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Main Symptom: Cystitis (Urinary Tract Infections/Inflammation) . . . . . 214 Incontinence, Enuresis (Bedwetting), Frequent Micturition (Urination) . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Impotence, Weak Libido . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Gynecological Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Morning Sickness During Pregnancy . . . . . . . . 218 6 Chinese Dietetics At a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Foods Classified by Phase/ Organ Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Phase: Earth Organ Network: Spleen/Pancreas, Stomach . . 223 Phase: Metal Organ Network: Lung–Large Intestine . . . . . . . 228 Phase: Water Organ Network: Kidney–Bladder . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Phase: Wood Organ Network: Liver–Gallbladder . . . . . . . . . . 233 Phase: Fire Organ Network: Heart–Small Intestine . . . . . . 236 Foods from A to Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 7 Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Further Reading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 X Contents “Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food.” Hippocrates, ca. 460–ca. 370 BC About this Book The concepts of Chinese nutrition, or the effects of food on our health, have a 3000-year tradition in China. Records dating back as far as the third cen- tury BC state that there was little difference between the application of foods and that of medi- cine. Recipes for foods were often similar to those for medicines. A quote by a famous fourteenth-century physician describes the role of Chinese nutrition within Tra- ditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): “Doctors first have to find the cause for an illness and determine which disharmony prevails. To balance this dishar- mony, the first and foremost measure is appropri- ate diet. It is not until this measure bears no results that one should use medicines.” Chinese nutritional therapy is closely related to acupuncture and medicinal plant medicine and follows the same diagnostic principles. It focuses on the qualitative effects of foods on the body. The term “qi,” which has many meanings in Chinese, including life force or life energy, is of vital signifi- cance in this context. Health is an expression of balanced qi; disease occurs when qi is unbalanced. The body extracts and absorbs qi from food. Foods, therefore, are mild therapeutic agents that help the body stay balanced, or bring it back into bal- ance. Food classification follows the same criteria used for Chinese medicinal herbs: thermal nature, flavor, organ network, and direction of energy flow. Chinese culture reflects an awareness of the heal- ing qualities of food as a kind of folk wisdom, even today. Food and health are favorite topics of con- versation. “Did you eat well today?” replaces “Hello” as a popular greeting. What we regard as complicated is practiced on a daily basis in China, for example, the simple balancing of hot and cold: Cold weather is balanced by eating foods that have a warming effect on the body, such as ginger tea, garlic, fennel, oats, lamb, salmon, etc. Hot weather is balanced by eating cooling foods such as raw fruit and vegetables, salads or, barley. This knowledge of the healing qualities of food was practiced and treasured in our own culture until recently, but has gotten lost in the trend toward “fast food.” Similar connections between food and medicine have been made since antiq- uity. Hippocrates recommended “Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food.” Hildegard von Bingen, the eleventh-century German visionary naturalist and healer, used foods for healing by devising energetic classifications that are surpris- ingly similar to Chinese food classifications. Even the original meaning of the word “dietetics,” drawn from the Greek “diaita”—“life care” or “art of living”—shows the comprehensive meaning of diet as supporting life. Western nutritional therapy, a relatively young sci- ence, applies primarily quantitative criteria to food. It classifies food by nutrients such as carbo- hydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, trace elements, and minerals. For diabetes, for example, it pre- scribes a quantitative diet that measures the glycemic index of foods. However, there is increas- ing interest in the qualitative aspects of foods in the Western world, in part due to the rapid increase of food-related illnesses and the obser- vation that people can react very differently and very strongly to the same food. Like acupuncture and medicinal plant therapy, Chinese nutritional therapy can offer valuable perspectives in this con- text. XI Current Western scientific methods are not yet able to offer plausible explanations for the concept of energetics in Chinese nutrition. This difficulty in dealing with unfamiliar concepts starts with the term qi, which is viewed with intellectual skepti- cism in the West. Qi, however, can be experienced through the practice of qi gong (a healing art that combines movement and meditation). With this book, I would like to awaken the curios- ity in my readers that has always been the spark for moving forward and making progress. Chinese nutrition is a great—and delicious—method for taking a closer look at what we eat and for looking beyond what we know and are used to. It chal- lenges us to practical experimentation, because only those who put theory into practice by cooking will profit—in body and soul! Have fun and enjoy your meal! Herrsching, Spring 2004 Joerg Kastner Acknowledgements A heartfelt “thank you” to my parents, who gave me the freedom to walk uncommon paths, and to my teachers, who showed me the way. My grati- tude also goes out to my patients, who time and time again have proven to me how consistent inte- gration of Chinese nutrition into our daily diet helps overcome illness and creates health. I am also grateful to all the people who have attended my seminars, for their willingness to be inspired by this initially rather unfamiliar body of thought and to practice its principles in their own life and with their patients. I especially thank my wife, Ulrike, who has stood by me and supported me all the way and who demonstrates to me continu- ally the culinary, sensual pleasures of Chinese nutrition. A big “thank you” also goes out to my editor Angelika-M. Findgott for providing such valuable guidance and showing so much editorial patience, and to Johanna Cummings-Pertl, for her meticulous editing of the English translation of this book, and for offering many suggestions for improvements. Together, they made the U.S. edi- tion of this book even better than the German original. XII About this book Structure and Use of this Book The first chapter of this book, “Introduction to the Basic Principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chinese Dietetics,” introduces Chinese nutri- tion theory using practical examples. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce Chinese dietetics in practice. Chapter 2 covers key dietary concepts such as healthy eating habits and eating in harmony with seasonal and constitutional factors. Chapter 3 out- lines nutritional therapy for the most important pathological processes and provides an overview and orientation framework for symptoms and diagnosis. Chapter 4, “Food Classification,” is based on a vari- ety of source texts and applies their concepts to the most common “Western” foods. Here you will find detailed information about the nature and use of foods and food groups in nutritional therapy. In case of contradictions between the authors regarding classification, I endeavored to classify foods according to my own clinical experience. The clinical examples in Chapter 5, “Analogy of Western Diagnoses with Syndromes in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM),” intend to establish a bridge to Chinese syndrome diagnosis. By their very nature, these offer abridged and incomplete introductions to a very large field of knowledge. They are designed to encourage Western practitio- ners to combine Western with Eastern thinking. Lay readers are advised that for disorders such as hypertension, asthma, Crohn disease, etc., any therapeutic measure should always be discussed with the treating physician and should be harmo- nized with Western methods of treatment. My practice, however, has proven to me repeatedly that Chinese nutrition is an excellent complement to Western treatments and also offers outstanding synergies with other naturopathic therapies. In this book, I have consciously avoided the use of Chinese medicinal plants in recipes. While com- monly used in China, Chinese herbal therapy requires many years of experience and a high level of education on the part of the practitioner, as well as reliable quality control of the preparations used. For the reader in a hurry, Chapter 6 provides charts of the most commonly used foods grouped by organ network. “Foods from A to Z” offers a quick guide to the key characteristics of the most com- mon foods. The glossary in Chapter 7 provides definitions of the English terms most frequently used in this book and lists their Chinese translations. The terminology used in this book is based on “A Prac- tical Dictionary of Chinese Medicine” by Nigel Wiseman and Feng Ye (Paradigm Publications, 1998, 2nd edition). Thieme International, in choos- ing this dictionary as its standard, recognizes the monumental contributions that Nigel Wiseman and Feng Ye have made to the standardization of TCM terminology in the English-speaking world. For more information on terminology, see Chapter 7. XIII Page intentionally left blank 1 Theory A Introduction to the Basic Principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chinese Dietetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B Methodology of Nutritional Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Page intentionally left blank Introduction to the Basic Principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chinese Dietetics A Yin and Yang The basic principles of Traditional Chinese Medi- cine (TCM) are rooted in the Taoist philosophy of yin and yang. These two polar opposites organize and explain the ongoing process of natural change and transformation in the universe. According to ancient lore, yang marks the sunny side and yin the shady side of a hill. In the theory of yin and yang, all things and phenomena of the cosmos contain these two complementary aspects. The traditional Taoist symbol for com- pleteness and harmony is the merging monad of yin and yang. The standard of TCM, the Huang Di Nei Jing, “The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine,” dates as far back as 500–300 BC. This 18-volume classic work has two parts, Ling Shu and Su We. The Su Wen explains the theoretical foundations of TCM in the form of a dialogue between the legendary Yellow Emperor Huan Di and his personal physician Shi Po. The Ling Shu, the practical part of the Nei Jing, reports on therapies and their uses in TCM: acu- puncture, moxibustion, nutritional therapy, and the use of medicinal herbs. TCM is rooted in the Taoist worldview employed by physicians and philosophers for centuries as a guide for viewing and interpreting natural phe- nomena. Tao means harmony–destination–way, the “all-in- one,” the origin of the world. The teachings of Tao- ism are based on the work Tao te King (Tao te Ching), “The Book of the Way and of Virtue,” by the famous Chinese scholar Lao Tse (600 BC). Guided by the Taoist perspective, “natural scien- tists” took the findings of these observations of nature and applied them to humans. They regarded the human being as a natural being, a part of nature, subject to and dependent on nature’s processes. The main principle of Tao is represented by the two polarities yin and yang, which, according to Taoist belief, mirror all phenomena in the uni- verse. 3 Fig. 1.1 Monad Yin Yang Moon Sun Shadow/night Light/day Dark Light Passive Active Water Fire Down Up Structure Function Right Left Cold Hot Plant-based foods Animal-based foods Heaven Earth Autumn, winter Spring, summer Relative stasis Evident motion Heavy Light Yin Yang Woman Man Right Left Receptive Creative Stomach, front Back, rear From waist down From waist up Body interior Body surface Viscera (storage organs) zang (heart) Bowels (hollow organs) fu (stomach) Organ structure Organ function Blood, body fluids Qi, life energy Bones/organs/ sinews Skin/muscles/ body hair Viscera Bowels Gu qi (drum qi) Defense qi (wei qi) Controlling vessel (ren mai) Governing vessel (du mai) 4 Introduction to the Basic Principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chinese Dietetics m In People m In Nature

See more

Similar Chinese Nutrition Therapy